How to Help Someone with Drug Addiction

 It can be hard to watch a family member, friend, or co-worker struggle with drug or alcohol addiction. You may wonder what you can do to help in this scenario, and if the individual even wants your assistance. Someone with alcoholism is physically and psychologically dependent on alcohol. They often have trouble managing their drinking habits. Even if it creates problems, they may choose to continue drinking. These problems can cause conflict with their own personal, professional, and social relationships, as well as lead to lasting health effects. While it is up to the individual to begin their voyage of sobriety voluntarily, you can assist as well. Read on to take some measures to assist your friend, family member, or loved one. 

Decide what you have to say: 

Let the person know that you are there for them and that you care. Try formulating favorable and supportive statements. Using “I” statements decreases indictment and allows you to be an active participant in the debate. Bringing up a particular issue may be useful. Show them your support in both your words and your actions. Prepare for potential responses. Regardless of the response, you should remain calm and show respect and support.

Choose the right time and place: 

Have the discussion in a location where you know you’re going to have peace of mind and privacy. You will also want to remove any distractions in order to have the complete attention of the person. If you cannot find a good place, it may make sense to talk while driving. But don’t let the other person drive the car. They may be under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, which could result in a DUI in Knoxville, for example (if they lived in Tennessee). If possible, the individual should be sober when you talk with them.

Listen with Honesty: 

The best thing you can do if the individual has an alcohol problem is to be open and honest about it with them. Hoping the person gets better on their own won’t change the scenario. Say to your loved one that you’re concerned they’re drinking too much, and let them know you’re going to support them. Be ready to face a response that is negative. Give them all the space and time they require and listen to their response intently and thoughtfully.  

Give them your full support: 

Realize you can’t force someone into treatment who doesn’t want to go. All you can do is express your concern and support. It is up to them to decide whether they are going to face their problem. Be empathetic and genuine. Imagine what your response might be if the roles were reversed.

Take Action: 

If a direct approach doesn’t work, you may want to take more drastic action by involving othef friends or family members. This will require more planning, sharing, and presenting an alternative for therapy. Friends, family members, and co-workers can all come together during this phase to face the individual and encourage them to be treated.

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